Welcome to Canary Island Date Palm Trees

The Canary Island Date Palm Tree has been a gift to landscapers throughout the world. Known for their immense green crown sitting on top of a beautifully carved nut, gives the Canary Island Date Palm Tree an appearance of a pineapple. The Canary Island Date Palm Tree originates from the Canary Islands which are a small set of islands off the coast of Western Sahara and Morocco.

These majestic Canary Island Date Palm Trees can stand alone as a center piece or can be placed in linear landscapes to give a dramatic appearance. The Canary Island Date Palm Tree can grow to a mature height of 60 feet or more. The trunk of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree is massive and embezzled with diamond leaf scars. These leaf scars were form from old leaves that have fallen off the Canary Island Date Palm Tree. The botanical name for the Canary Island Date Palm Tree is Phoenix Canariensis which belongs to the Phoenix-family of palm trees. The Phoenix-family of palm trees is visibly recognizable due to their pointy needles which emerge from the leaves. The Canary Island Date is truly a remarkable palm tree and with the right lighting, can become the envy of the neighborhood.

Quick Tips on Canary Island Date Palm Trees

Canary Island Date Palm Tree should be given enough space to grow upright in full sun. Canary Island Date Palm Tree needs well drained soil and is somewhat temperamental with alkaline soil types. Canary Island Date Palm Tree has a high salt tolerance.


More Tips on the Canary Island Date Palm Tree

Canary Island Date Tips
  • - Pruning will be required for the Canary Island Date Palm Tree and prune only fronds which hang below the horizontal line of the crown.
  • - The old fronds which fall off the Canary Island Date Palm Tree leave a beautiful diamond-shaped scarring on the trunk.
  • - Avoid damage to the trunk of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree which leads to Ganoderma rot.

Characteristics of a Canary Palm

This is the Nut of The Canary Island Date Palm. Ferns are known to grow on the nut and is completely natural The Canary Island Date Palm Tree has a large crown of vibrant green leaves that extend between 8 to 15 feet long. The Canary Island Date Palm Tree has a massive trunk with diamond embezzled markings.


More Characteristics of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree:

General Information on Canary Island Date Palm Trees:

06.12.2009 | 16 Comments

Description on Canary Island Date Palm Trees:

Use and Management of Canary Island Date Palm Trees:

Canary Island Date Palm should be grown in full sun on fertile, moist soil for best growth but is tolerant of any well-drained soil. It can be planted on the inland side of coastal condominiums and large homes due to moderately high salt-tolerance. It does well as a street or avenue tree, even in confined soil spaces. Canary Island Date Palm will require pruning to remove old fronds. Older leaves frequently become chlorotic from magnesium or potassium-deficiency. Preventive applications of appropriate fertilizer helps avoid this. Avoid damage to the trunk by locating it properly in the landscape and keeping landscape maintenance equipment away. Damaged trees are susceptible to Ganoderma rot.



Selecting a Canary Island Date Palm Tree:

12.01.2006 |

Most nurseries or online shopping stores will provide great help when selecting a Canary Island Date Palm Tree. It is very important, when selecting a Canary Island Date Palm Tree, you receive the best quality at the best price. Sometimes it’s worth to pay a little extra if you know the Canary Island Date Palm Tree is coming from a trustable nursery. When selecting the Canary Island Date Palm Tree, make sure the crown is full by having at least 25 to 50 green fronds. The fronds of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree should not physically appear soft and weak, the fronds should be tough and rugged. The trunk on the Canary Island Date Palm Tree should not have any green coloring, this would be an indication of fungus or bacteria growth. The trunk of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree depends on the type of growth patterns used and does not really affect the overall healthiness of the palm.

Another factor to consider when selecting a Canary Island Date Palm Tree is making sure you are not receiving a hybrid palm tree. Sometimes, usually amongst the Phoenix Family of palm trees, the potential to cross breed is imminent for the Canary Island Date Palm Tree. It is not the end of the world and sometimes people like the unique look of the crown, but if you want a certified palm tree, make sure you purchase the palm tree in a nursery that officially certifies them as the actual Canary Island Date Palm Tree with the botanical name of Phoenix Canariensis. This certification will not only bring peace of mind to you but if you move or want to re-sell the palm tree, at least you have some documentation that the palm tree has been inspected and is a real Canary Island Date Palm Tree.

Key Points on Selecting a Canary Island Date Palm Tree

  • Make sure when choosing your canary Island Date Palm Tree it is from a trustable source.
  • The crown of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree should be full and have between 25 – 50 green fronds.
  • The trunk of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree should be free of any green coloring.
  • When selecting a Canary island Date Palm Tree, make sure you are choosing the right species of palm and not a hybrid.
  • Make sure you receive a certification for the Canary Island Date Palm Tree with the botanical name of Phoenix Canariensis.

Great Places for a Canary Island Date Palm Trees:

- The Canary Island Date Palm Tree can be placed in large yards.

- The Canary Island Date Palm Tree can be used to create an oasis or getaway area from the mundane work schedule.

- The Canary Island Date Palm Tree can be placed for a focal point in a neighborhood or apartments.

- The Canary Island Date Palm Tree can be placed outside a business or shopping center to attract attention.

- The Canary Island Date Palm Tree can be cultivated to produce seeds, which can be sold or traded.

- The Canary Island Date Palm Tree can bring in tropical birds and wildlife to your yard or business.

- The Canary Island Date Palm Tree can provide shade for picnics or get-togethers.

- The Canary Island Date Palm Tree can provide an area of refuge for shade seekers and hammocks.


Installing a Canary Island Date Palm Tree:

12.01.2006 | 16 Comments

When deciding to install a Canary Island Date Palm Tree, make sure you have the sufficient space to place the palm tree. Try to visualize the Canary Island Date Palm Tree in your yard and whether or not it’s going to obstruct the view when it matures. Once you have selected the area in which the Canary Island Date Palm Tree will be placed, get ready to dig a large enough area for the root ball. The hole has to be at least 1 to 2 feet larger than the root ball. Once you have the hole dug, place the Canary Island Date Palm Tree in the hole, either by using a dolly or having some help, and make sure there is no gap between the bottom of the root ball and the dirt beneath the root ball. There should be no air left when the dirt is placed in and around the root ball. Before placing the dirt back in the hole, this would be the best time to fertilize the Canary Island Date Palm Tree.

Make sure not to use heavy duty fertilizer since this might damage the roots, just use a basic palm fertilizer a 7-3-7 mix or 8-4-8 mix. After applying the fertilizer, place the dirt back into the hole and thoroughly cover the root ball. This is a very important step, do not bury any part of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree under the dirt line, this will ultimately kill the palm by way of rotting. Once you have the dirt inside the hole, thoroughly drench the Canary Island Date Palm Tree with water. Depending on what size you have, you might want to consider bracing the Canary Island Date Palm Tree. As an added tip, bury heavy duty fertilizer for the Canary Island Date Palm Tree at least 2 feet away from the trunk and thoroughly drench the area.

Key Points on Installing a Canary Island Date Palm Tree:

04.12.2008 | 16 Comments

  • Hole of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree should be 1 to 2 feet wider than the root ball.
  • Make sure there is no gap underneath the root ball of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree.
  • Use a basic palm fertilizer for the Canary Island Date Palm Tree when the hole is dug.
  • Do not place any part of the Canary Island Date Palm Tree trunk underneath the dirt.

Fusarium Wilt of Canary Island Date Palm (Pineapple Palm Tree):

Article By edis.ifas.ufl.edu | 16 Comments

intro:
Unlike most fungal diseases of palms, this disease is very host specific, with the primary host being Phoenix canariensis (Canary Island date palm). It is caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. canariensis. The name “Fusarium wilt of Canary Island date palm” was given to this disease to distinguish it from two other Fusarium wilt diseases that occur on palms, which are also very host specific. In Florida (and the U.S.), the name is often shortened to simply “Fusarium wilt.” "Fusarium wilt of date palm" (also called Bayoud disease) only occurs on Phoenix dactylifera, and thus far is restricted to Morocco and Algeria. It is caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. albedinis. "Fusarium wilt of oil palm" only occurs on Elaeis guineenis and Elaeis oleifera, and thus far is restricted to countries in Central Africa and South America. It is caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. elaeidis.

Pathogen and HostsArticle edis.ifas.ufl.edu

Fusarium wilt of Canary Island date palm is caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. canariensis. It was first documented in the U.S. in the 1970s in California, but was not documented in Florida until 1994. The disease has been observed in Australia, France, Greece, Italy and Japan. This fungus causes a vascular wilt of the palm. Specifically, it obstructs the xylem (water-conducting) tissue, which results in the symptoms of desiccation and death described below. The fungus produces short-lived spores (macroconidia and microconidia). It also produces chlamydospores, spores that will live in the soil and plant tissue for long time periods (usually years). Because most of the root system is left behind after a palm dies from this disease, this mass of roots may act as a reservoir for the fungus for long time periods. Experimental and observational evidence suggests that other Phoenix species may be susceptible to this fungus, including Phoenix dactylifera (date palm), Phoenix reclinata (Senegal date palm), and Phoenix sylvestris (wild date palm), but not Phoenix roebelenii (pygmy date palm). The disease has also been noted on Washingtonia filifera (California fan palm) in one location each in California and Australia. Both these sites had previously contained diseased Canary Island date palms that died from Fusarium wilt. However, the field diagnosis of Fusarium wilt-like symptoms on Washingtonia robusta (Mexican fan palm), a palm commonly grown throughout Florida, can probably be attributed to petiole/rachis blight. See the fact sheet on this disease at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp145. From 1999 through 2004, the Florida Extension Plant Disease Clinic reported 71 palm samples positive for Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. canariensis. Of these, 56 were Phoenix canariensis, 4 were Phoenix dactylifera, 1 was a Phoenix sylvestris, 5 were unidentified Phoenix spp., 4 were palms of unknown genera (information not provided when sample submitted), and 1 was a Washingtonia robusta. Thus, in Florida, as for most of the world, the vast majority of palms diagnosed with Fusarium wilt have been Phoenix canariensis.

Palm Anatomy Article edis.ifas.ufl.edu
To understand the symptoms described below, the terminology regarding palm anatomy must be defined. Phoenix species are an example of a pinnate or feather-leaf palm. The entire leaf is often called a frond. The leaf consists of a blade, a petiole and a leaf base. The leaf base is the broad section that attaches to the trunk. The petiole is the “stem” of the leaf from the leaf base to the point where leaflets begin to attach to it. On a feather-leaf palm, the extension of the petiole into the leaf blade where all the leaflets attach is called the rachis. The leaflets are often referred to as pinnae.

SymptomsArticle edis.ifas.ufl.edu
Although the name “Fusarium wilt” implies that the primary symptom will be a wilt, vascular wilts in palms do not cause wilt symptoms. Instead, they cause leaf desiccation and leaf death symptoms. As with any disease, a progression of symptoms is observed with Fusarium wilt. Initial symptoms normally occur on the lowest (oldest) living leaves. Leaflets, either all of them or only a portion, on only one side of the rachis will be discolored, usually a shade of brown due to desiccation or death. The leaflets on the opposite side of the rachis will be healthy. This very distinctive symptom is often referred to as a “one-sided wilt” or “one-sided death” (Figure 1). Eventually, the leaflets on the other side of the rachis will turn brown also, and the entire leaf dies.

A reddish-brown or dark-brown streak or stripe will be observed on the petiole and rachis of the affected frond, initially on the same side where the first dead leaflets appeared, and usually beginning at or near the leaf base (Figure 2). This streak may run the full length of the petiole and rachis, or just a portion of it. Internal discoloration will be observed in both cross-sections and longitudinal sections of the discolored petiole and rachis (Figure 3). This internal discoloration is due to the fungus infesting the xylem tissue.

The disease symptoms normally begin on the lowest (oldest) leaves and then move up the canopy, progressively killing younger and younger leaves (Figure 4). The palm may die relatively quickly (within months) or linger for a couple of years. The reasons for this disparity is not known. Possible variations in symptoms include the disease initially starting mid-canopy rather than at the bottom of the canopy. For some leaves, the leaflets may begin turning brown at the leaf tip and on both sides at once, rather than just on one side. It has also been noted that the presence of palm weevils in the bud of Fusarium wilt-stressed palms hasten the decline of the palm, and may complicate determining the cause of the palm's decline.

DiagnosisArticle edis.ifas.ufl.edu
Field diagnosis can often be made based on the symptoms described above, especially if the symptoms are typical ones. The only other disease Fusarium wilt of Canary Island date palm might be confused with is petiole/rachis blight. The latter is not a true vascular wilt and usually does not kill the palm, but the resulting individual leaf symptoms can be very similar on a Phoenix species. See the fact sheet on this disease at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pp145.

While a molecular laboratory diagnosis to confirm the field diagnosis may not be a necessary expense for a landscape situation, it is critical if the disease symptoms are occurring in a palm nursery. To confirm the field diagnosis, a laboratory must isolate the pathogen from the affected leaf tissue and then conduct a molecular test on the isolated culture. Currently, only the Florida Extension Plant Disease Clinic in Gainesville conducts this molecular test. Contact your local county Extension office or the Clinic for complete details on correct sample submission procedures and cost of a laboratory diagnosis.

Molecular confirmation of the isolated fungus is critical. There are numerous Fusarium oxysporum isolates that do not cause disease, but may be associated with palm material. Unfortunately, it is not possible to separate pathogenic isolates from non-pathogenic isolates based on their appearance in culture. Thus, isolation of a fungus that looks like F. oxysporum does not confirm the field diagnosis. The fungus growing on the culture plate is then subjected to a molecular test that is specific for F. oxysporum f. sp. canariensis.

If the field symptoms appear typical for Fusarium wilt, but the molecular test results are negative, then there are two things to consider. First, the symptoms may not be an expression of Fusarium wilt, but may be an expression of petiole/rachis blight. Many of the petiole/rachis blight pathogens are not culturable from plant tissue. Second, the symptoms may be an expression of Fusarium wilt, but a false negative was obtained from the molecular test. No diagnostic test is perfect every time.

The next step would be to obtain new samples from the diseased palm or similarly diseased palm and resubmit to the Clinic for the molecular test for F. oxysporum f. sp. canariensis and to confirm presence or absence of petiole/rachis blight pathogens. Be sure to discuss the problem with the clinic staff before resubmitting samples. If no symptomatic leaves are available, wait until new symptoms develop before resubmitting.